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    1. Sasha Kasas says:

      A dynamic, varied program from the Kronos Quartet last night – from Wagner to Philip Glass, casually ending with a little-known blues song from the 30s. They handled it all effortlessly, one moment tackling the rhythmically challenging Dessner’s “Aheym”, and later showing their more tender side with the traditional Swedish folk song “Tusen Tankar (A Thousand Thoughts)”.

    2. Roger Glenn says:

      Here is some additional information about the Beware the Vibes of March™ show:

      Roger Glenn and The Bach Dancing & Dynamite Society presents:
      Beware the Vibes of March™

      The Vibraphone is an instrument that is sometimes overlooked as part of the inventory of jazz and latin music. To showcase the importance of the instrument, some history and what it has offered to these music genres, we will be honoring past, present and future vibraphone performers. A collection of vibists selected will perform numbers from some of the great icons who have made the instrument famous.
           On vibes will be: Rex Allen with music of Lionel Hampton; Charlie Barreda with music of Cal Tjader; Michael Hatfield with music of Gary Burton; Smith Dobson V with music of Milt Jackson and Roger Glenn with music of Tito Puente.
           Backing the vibists will be a tremendous rhythm section consisting of David K. Mathews (Santana) on piano, Robb Fisher (Cal Tjader) on bass; Leon Joyce, Jr. (Ramsey Lewis) on drums.

      An afternoon of frenetic delight awaits with multiple vibraphones onstage. Come join us — be aware, but… Beware the Vibes of March!

      ______________

      Roger Glenn, master multi-instrumentalist, composer and entertainer on the flute, sax and vibraphone, is the son of the late Tyree Glenn who was one of the 57 notable jazz musicians pictured in the historic photo “A Great Day in Harlem.” Glenn’s earliest memories as a toddler was hammering on the vibes which his father had rolled next to his crib. Following those early years, he has performed, toured and recorded to enthusiastic, sold out audiences with jazz legends Dizzy Gillespie, Mongo Santamaria, Rosemary Clooney, Herbie Mann and Pete Escovedo. Roger’s flute playing is featured on the Grammy Award winning album “La Onda Va Bien” with Cal Tjader, as well as many notable recordings by Donald Byrd, Peaches and Herb, ConFunkShun and Bobby Hutcherson. Living in the SF Bay Area since the mid-1970s, Roger works with many local and touring groups as well as his own “Roger Glenn Latin Jazz Ensemble” (finalizing studio production on his long-awaited CD “In the Moment”), “Roger Glenn Jazz Organ Trio” and “The San Francisco Jazz Quartet.” He plans to celebrate the “Vibes of March” as an annual event.

      Rex Allen’s mallet work has been heard for almost 40 years in San Francisco’s Swing scene with his 5-piece “Rex Allen’s Swing Express®” and elsewhere at jazz festivals from the Sacramento Jubilee to Indiana’s Jazz Artist Musicale. Allen has led the Tommy Dorsey and Gene Krupa Orchestras, and his own big band, now in its 37th year. He’s also known widely as a trombonist and drummer. His company America Swings Again! produces concerts and private events throughout the West Coast. Look for Rex’s upcoming vibes album, “Mallets of Forethought.”

      Michael Hatfield began playing vibraphone in high school when none of the other percussionists in the orchestra wanted to take it on. He studied with Gary Burton at Berklee College of Music, and then taught there for several years before taking up residence in San Francisco. Having way too much fun performing the music he loves, he plays everything from “cartoon fusion” to “torch songs.” Hatfield has several recordings on iTunes with his band “The Mallet Band” and is featured on several movie sound tracks and commercial jingles.

      Charlie Barreda, arranger, composer, multi-instrumentalist on keyboards, vibraphone, marimba, drums and percussion whose career started at the age of 12 in his native Peru. His formal training began in San Francisco at the Music & Arts Institute of San Francisco, where he studied classical percussion with Jack Van Der Wyck. He obtained a Masters Degree in Percussion and taught at the institute until 1988 when it closed. His Jazz vibes teacher was John Rae who had played with George Shearing, Mongo Santamaria and others. Since moving to San Francisco in 1973, Barreda has performed and recorded with the likes of Jules Broussard, E.W. Wainwright, George Cables, Si Perkoff, Tony Menjivar, Leo Rosales, Orestes Vilato, Louie Romero, Karl Perazzo, Pete Escovedo, and now “Alta Havana” and the new Salsa group “Vibrason” featuring the vibes. In addition to freelancing, Barreda’s own bands include “Corcovado,” “The Marimba Connection” and “Charlie Barreda SF Latin Jazz”, with CD release of the same name.

      Drummer-vibraphonist-saxophonist Smith Dobson V has been performing in the Bay Area for over twenty years. Originally from Santa Cruz, Dobson is a member of an important jazz family with his late father, Smith Dobson IV (pianist), his grandmother Norma, mother Gail, and sister all vocalists and grandfather Smith III, Jazz accordionist. He has worked with some local and international Jazz greats such as Bobby Hutcherson, Red Rodney, John Handy, Sheila Jordan, Red Holloway, Pete and Conte Condoli, Phillip Harper, Hal Stein, Noel Jewkes and Ben Goldberg. Since 2001, Dobson has turned much of his artistic energy to composing. In January 2007, he released his first album of original compositions entitled “Basement Bloodlines” on the Evander Music label. Dobson was featured at last year’s Monterey Jazz Festival with his band “Prez Kids,” playing Jazz influenced by the iconic Lester Young and early swing era.

      David K. Mathews is known in the S.F bay area as an eclectic musician with the ability to play many musical styles in an idiomatically correct fashion. Playing professionally since 1975, performing on the piano, electric piano, Hammond organ, clarinet and synthesizers, Mathews has worked and/or recorded with diverse artists, and currently as the keyboard player with Santana. At age 23, Mathews joined and toured for two years with the legendary Funk/Soul group “Tower of Power,” replacing original organist Chester Thompson. Years 1988-2009 (21 years) as the organist/pianist with Grammy Award Winning Queen of Rhythm & Blues, Etta James; touring with her to most of the world’s major jazz and blues festivals. Further credits among the many include: Wayne Shorter, John Handy, Boz Scaggs, Taj Mahal, Bonnie Raitt, Tito Puente, Armando Peraza and Sheila E.

      For six years, bassist Robb Fisher toured and recorded with the legendary Cal Tjader, anchoring Cal’s Grammy Award winning album, “La Onda Va Bien” and Grammy Nominee album, “Gozame Pero Ya.” He has also worked extensively and recorded with such jazz and Latin luminaries as Chet Baker, Art Pepper, Carmen McRae, Tania Maria, Clare Fischer, Poncho Sanchez, Buddy Montgomery, Mel Martin, Michael Wolff, Dick Whittington and Rob Schneiderman. He continues to perform in the Bay Area with various local jazz performers

      Leon Joyce, Jr. whose musical career began in high school, but was really shaped and nurtured when he joined the Marine Corps in 1976. As a drummer Leon has worked for a wide variety of top artists. A short list would include Ramsey Lewis, Nancy Wilson, Smokey Robinson, Teena Marie, Howard Hewitt, Norman Connors, Tom Browne, Ann Hampton-Callaway, Yve Evans, Monty Alexander, Barry Harris, James Carter, Clark Terry, Conte Condoli, Ellis Marsalis, Larry Coryell, Gary Bartz, Billy Harper, Pete Fountain, Barbara Morrison, Sista Monica, Jamie Davis, Patti LaBelle & Mary Wilson. Joyce also leads his own Trio.

    3. Mika Pontecorvo says:

      Our updated schedule of performers at NextNow’s All Tomorrows After-Parties 2015 can be found at http://nextnow.edgebuzz.tv (please check this link as we have added some artists, and have time information..
      Thanks, Mika Pontecorvo (curator NextNow)

    4. Ralph and Virginia Dudgeon says:

      Hello:

      This is a message for Tom: I’ll be playing a concert in Oakland on 2 November 2019 and it would be nice to see you again and catch up.

    5. ArtsEarth says:

      I was just notified that I HAVE TO PLAY the KEYBOARD instead of beautiful 10 foot concert grand for my concert tomorrow, BECAUSE OF THE COVID!!! The city/state agency just changed the indoor event rule, so now concert has to happen outdoor. I will deal with it, but really tough, considering the program I’ve been thinking/preparing – now I’m thinking should I change the program? But there is no time for it, it’s tomorrow!

      LET’S GET VACCINATED if you are able/eligible and/or WEAR MASKS/SOCIAL DISTANCE diligently to stop this pandemic as soon as possible. We all have suffered enough from this, and we could have been enjoying more normal life by now if we all make the effort to stop this using the tool[s] available to all of us. I will do my best tomorrow, I will play the keyboard with best of my ability outdoor no matter how challenging it is, following the protocol and for the safety of many people. THANKS!!!!!
      -Mokoto Honda – https://www.motokohonda.com/

    6. Lee Kopp says:

      Some edited playbill notes on the January 22 program:
      George Gershwin wrote An American In Paris after a visit to France and it premiered at Carnegie Hall on Dec 13, 1928. He achieved early success as one of the most brilliant songwriters on Broadway, but had more ambitious dreams. He aspired to be recognized as a serious classical composer, but felt that American classical music had to incorporate elements of jazz in order to find a distinctive national voice. Rhapsody in Blue was Gershwin’s first step in that direction, followed by the Concerto in F, An American in Paris, and finally, Porgy and Bess. The opening jaunty section of American in Paris is in the typical French style in the manner of Debussy followed by a rich “blues” which is more intense and simple than the predeeding.

      Aaron Copland wrote Appalachian Spring for choreographer Matha Graham based on “The Dance”, a section of a poem by Hart Crane. In the original context of the poem, “spring” was meant as a source of water, not a season. Copland had written two earlier ballets on American themes (Billy the Kid and Rodeo); Appalachian Spring is different from its predecessors in that its mood is gentle and lyrical from beginning to end. Copland received the Pulitzer Prize in music for Appalachian Spring in 1945. The various musical sections are contrasted in tempo and character based on simple scales and triads with a folksy feeling of square dances and country fiddlers, unison strings of sentiment and religious tones, variations on a Shaker theme sung by a solo clarinet, and a suite based on the Shaker melody “Simple Gifts.” All blend together in a score with a remarkable sense of unity and an aura of peace and love.

      Leonard Bernstein’s fame in writing Broadway shows grew simultaneously with his career as a classical conductor and concert composer. The ease with which he moved back and forth between popular and serious music set him apart from contemporaries in either field. Bernstein wrote the hit musical On the Town in 1944 at age 26. Dissonances that one would think are at home only in classical music blend easily with dynamic, jazz-influenced musical idioms. The Three Dance Episodes in the program are based on the songs, “New York, New York/The Great Lover”, “Lonely Town”, and “I Get Carried Away/Times Square 1944”.

      Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was widely recognized by the 1940s as one of the greatest jazz musicians in the United States. He first made his name with short numbers such as “Take the A Train”, “Sophisticated Lady”, and “In a Sentimental Mood”, but he always had the ambition to compose more extended works. His landmark work, “Black, Brown and Beige” was introduced at Ellington’s Carnegie Hall debut in 1943. It marked his transition from the jazz clubs to the concert hall. The composer called his work a three-movement jazz symphony, a “tone parallel”, meaning that it “paralleled” an extra-musical idea–namely the history of African-Americans from slvery to freedom, and their important contributions to American history and society. Ellington himself considered it one of his most important works. In the words of Wynton Marsalis:; “It sits alone in the history of jazz.”

    7. Lee Kopp says:

      Some edited playbill notes on the January 22 program:
      George Gershwin wrote An American In Paris after a visit to France and it premiered at Carnegie Hall on Dec 13, 1928. He achieved early success as one of the most brilliant songwriters on Broadway, but had more ambitious dreams. He aspired to be recognized as a serious classical composer, but felt that American classical music had to incorporate elements of jazz in order to find a distinctive national voice. Rhapsody in Blue was Gershwin’s first step in that direction, followed by the Concerto in F, An American in Paris, and finally, Porgy and Bess. The opening jaunty section of American in Paris is in the typical French style in the manner of Debussy followed by a rich “blues” which is more intense and simple than the predeeding.

      Aaron Copland wrote Appalachian Spring for choreographer Matha Graham based on “The Dance”, a section of a poem by Hart Crane. In the original context of the poem, “spring” was meant as a source of water, not a season. Copland had written two earlier ballets on American themes (Billy the Kid and Rodeo); Appalachian Spring is different from its predecessors in that its mood is gentle and lyrical from beginning to end. Copland received the Pulitzer Prize in music for Appalachian Spring in 1945. The various musical sections are contrasted in tempo and character based on simple scales and triads with a folksy feeling of square dances and country fiddlers, unison strings of sentiment and religious tones, variations on a Shaker theme sung by a solo clarinet, and a suite based on the Shaker melody “Simple Gifts.” All blend together in a score with a remarkable sense of unity and an aura of peace and love.

      Leonard Bernstein’s fame in writing Broadway shows grew simultaneously with his career as a classical conductor and concert composer. The ease with which he moved back and forth between popular and serious music set him apart from contemporaries in either field. Bernstein wrote the hit musical On the Town in 1944 at age 26. Dissonances that one would think are at home only in classical music blend easily with dynamic, jazz-influenced musical idioms. The Three Dance Episodes in the program are based on the songs, “New York, New York/The Great Lover”, “Lonely Town”, and “I Get Carried Away/Times Square 1944”.

      Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was widely recognized by the 1940s as one of the greatest jazz musicians in the United States. He first made his name with short numbers such as “Take the A Train”, “Sophisticated Lady”, and “In a Sentimental Mood”, but he always had the ambition to compose more extended works. His landmark work, “Black, Brown and Beige” was introduced at Ellington’s Carnegie Hall debut in 1943. It marked his transition from the jazz clubs to the concert hall. The composer called his work a three-movement jazz symphony, a “tone parallel”, meaning that it “paralleled” an extra-musical idea–namely the history of African-Americans from slvery to freedom, and their important contributions to American history and society. Ellington himself considered it one of his most important works. In the words of Wynton Marsalis:; “It sits alone in the history of jazz.”

    8. Lew Radin says:

      Hi,
      Is this class going to be offered again at a later date? I’m going to be away from home in feb but I’m interested.

      • ArtsEarth says:

        Thank you for the comment and this was February 2021, last year though we have talked with the artist and this course may be offered again, at a later date, TBD. Take care and a good weekend ahead.

    9. Lee Kopp says:

      This program has been changed. The Carmina Burana element (which takes 3 large choirs) will be moved to next season due to COVID concerns. Juan Pablo Jofre’s Double Concerto featuring Rachel Lee Priday and himself as soloists will still be included. Carlos Vieu will still conduct. Here is the rest of the program information. Can you please make this change for us? Thanks. Lee

      March 26-27, 2022 California Theatre
      Symphony San Jose presents “Feste romane”
      WHEN: Saturday, March 26 at 8pm and Sunday, March 27 at 2:30pm
      WHERE: The California Theater, 345 South First Street, San Jose, 95113
      TICKETS: 408.286.2600 or http://www.symphonysanjose.org
      Single Tickets: $55 to $115
      Conductor: Carlos Vieu
      Soloists: Juan Pablo Jofre, Bandoneon and Rachel Lee Priday, Violin

      This multifaceted concert features Respighi’s Feste romane. The program also includes two pieces by Brahms and a new lyrical double concerto performed by renowned classical violinist Rachel Lee Priday together with its composer, Juan Pablo Jofre, playing the haunting bandoneon.

      The Program:
      Johannes Brahms: Schicksalslied (Song of Destiny)
      Juan Pablo Jofre: Bandoneon Violin Double Concerto No. 1
      with Juan Pablo Jofre and Rachel Lee Priday
      Johannes Brahms: Nanie
      Ottorino Respighi: Feste romane

    10. Lee Kopp says:

      About the Venue: St. Francis Episcopal Church, 1205 Pine Avenue, San José, 95125
      St. Francis Episcopal Church in San Jose (Willow Glen) is a real gem of a performance space. Comfortable seating, space for social distancing, gorgeous acoustics. Easy access off Highway 280 and Meridian Avenue. Ample street parking available. And the Willow Glen downtown core is very near by with lots of nice dining opportunities. Love eating there.

    11. Lee Kopp says:

      If you can get there early, the Opening Ceremonies look really good. Calpulli Tonalehqueh of San Jose will be presenting the Art of Ancient Aztec Dance to open the festival on Saturday from 11:00am to 11:30am. The opening ceremony is a ritual with drums which calls the four elements (wind, water, fire, earth) and the four cardinal directions…North (Tezcatlipoca), East (Quetzalcoatl), South (Huitzilopochtli), and West (Xipe Totec) along with the Great Cosmos, Mother Earth, and the Center – Our Hearts. Traditionally, dancers carry the elements in the form of the atecocolli (a conch shell) which is played to call in the winds, popoxcommi (which carries fire), and copal (a sacred incense) is burnt which carries scented prayers on white smoke to the ancestors. The ritual is a ceremonial way to ask permission to be present and to call the gods of the directions to help guide and protect the space.

      This ritual is in deep respect of Mother Earth and the Cosmos, recognizing that we walk the Red Road (living life with purpose) and are of the elements. It is profoundly deep and important work in reconnecting us to our home – this planet.
      Two traditional Aztec Dances will then be performed.

    12. Lee Kopp says:

      Anybody still looking for the perfect gift for mom this weekend? Symphony San Jose has something special planned for attendees of Sunday’s Mother’s Day program at the California Theatre in downtown San Jose. I can’t say exactly what…but symphony volunteers will be passing out some simply beautiful and sweet gifts to the ladies in attendance. It should be the perfect ending to a glorious afternoon of music.

    13. Lee Kopp says:

      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

      The U.S. tour of the Dragon Ball Symphonic Adventure has been impacted by unexpected scheduling issues. Due to this, the May 27-29, 2022 performances presented by Symphony San Jose are cancelled. Tickets refunds will be automatically processed starting next week to each purchaser’s original payment method. Thank you for your understanding and apologies for any inconvenience this has caused.

    14. Lee Kopp says:

      The video attached is a short presentation of the Free Spring Dance Festival presented at Eastridge Center as a celebration of National Dance Week presented last month. It combined professional companies and dance schools. It is an annual event produced by sjDANCEco.org. Please join us for our program of World Premieres June 17 and 18 at the beautiful Hammer Theater Center in downtown San Jose’s SoFA (South of First Street Arts District.)

    15. ArtsEarth says:

      We are only as good as our community, thank you!

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